Search This Blog

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Creative Spot by Indra Anandasabapathy

An Amateur Horticulturist cum Photographer writes:


CURRY LEAF ( KARAPINCHA / KARUVEPELAI )


They were outdoors from late spring till a few days ago. They will remain here through the winter, till next spring. The solarium is kept at 55 degrees F at night, the temperature rising to 90 F often in the day from the sun's heat. So, artificial heat is required only at night on a really cold night (latter half of December, January, February, March) only. Why 55 degrees? The plants, mostly tropical, have over the years adapted to the lower temperature at night. Years ago, the curry leaf plants would shed their leaves by February. I thought they would not make it alive by spring. They did develop new leaves  by spring and they do not shed anymore. I had to get them used to the lower temperatures at night to keep the heating bill down. It is still an expensive hobby and needs work.The plants get watered well twice a week and manured/fertilized once a month. Pruning keeps the curry leaf plants at the current height of about 6 feet.In winter, the vents are all closed and the humidity causes condensation which is good for the orchids .


 The potted plants are indoors as the weather changes in fall

THE BIRD OF PARADISE IN BLOOM. ON ITS RIGHT, THE TEMPLE FLOWER TREE - CUT BACK TO RE ENTER THE SOLARIUM. IN THE FOREGROUND ARE THREE CURRY LEAF PLANTS - 6 foot tall . YOU SEE ONLY ONE IN THE PICTURE. THE ORCHIDS ARE ALL BACK IN EXCEPT FOR ONE - A CYMBIDIUM), WHICH NEEDS TO STAY OUT TILL THE TEMPERATURE DROPS FURTHER TO MAKE IT FLOWER.






ANOTHER TROPICAL PLANT - any   GUESSES?

HINT. GROWS IN THE HILL COUNTRY IN SRI LANKA. 



HERE IS A PICTURE IN BETTER  LIGHTING AS REQUESTED BY NIHAL


6 comments:

  1. SL food revolves round the ubiquitous karapincha. Growing these luxuries in NY. Just goes to show its appeal. Well done my good and faithful friend.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You have a rewarding hobby which must take a lot of your time. I must admit thst I am not much of a Gardner. My father was a FRHS - Fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society.
    Is the quiz plant an Anthurium?

    ReplyDelete
  3. My botany was just enough to pass the exam. My gardening skills are non existent. I cursed the grass when I mowed the lawn which was my only job in the garden. Now, as I have said before, my garden is Regent's Park with flowers all years round managed professionally.
    Nevertheless I do appreciate the skills of I.A. His patience and love of nature is a beacon for us all. I wish some of his photos had more background lighting to appreciate fully his brilliant indoor botanic garden which I too can now enjoy in the comfort of my armchair.
    In SL grass is considered a weed and a pest. When I first arrived in the UK I was greatly amused that the English were buying grass seeds. My knowledge has come on a little bit since then but not by much!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Indra, here's the late comer again, seeing the beautiful 'inmates' of your well ordered green house. Wish I knew more on the subject of plants to make a useful comment but I can still appreciate beauty when I see it and the 'showing off' character of some plants to mimic objects and animals and even dancers! It's amazing. You have done so well! It must have brought you hours, days and years of happiness. What a wonderful hobby! Thanks for sharing with us. Zita

    ReplyDelete
  5. THE PLANT IN PICTURE no. 4 is ARUM LILLY- remember the white flowers, often seen in wedding floral arrangements ( usually christian) in Sri Lanka.. I have trouble getting it to bloom the last few years. Will post a picture if it does.
    ia

    ReplyDelete
  6. It is a rewarding interest, lot of work but the rewards come when you see the flowers. We use the plants & flowers to decorate the house too.
    Which is another benefit.
    Thank you all for the kind remarks.


    Indra A

    ReplyDelete